Idea: LL and RR glasses on a 3D screen – Double Vision

(I had this idea in June 2011 and wrote this post in Oct 2011, but I decided to wait with publishing until my lovely colleague Sylvia could get the scoop and use it for a marketing action).

3D display lets you experience 3D images by letting your left eye see something different than your right eye (‘stereoscopy’). Most technologies for this (certainly the ones used in cinema) use special glasses. Active/passive, based on colours, polarisation, timing… It’s fascinating, but that’s not what I want to address here. What intrigues me, are less common usages: what if instead showing something different to eye1 (left) and eye2 (right), you show something different to person1 and person2?

https://unsplash.com/@mariocalvo

Continue reading Idea: LL and RR glasses on a 3D screen – Double Vision

Apple trailers: when 720p isn’t always 720p

One of the best places to look for high-quality movie trailers is Apple Trailers. They have lots of bandwidth and a large selection (altough they don’t have e.g. the new Indiana Jones 4 trailers, which are exclusively on Yahoo HD trailers).

Apple typically offers its HD trailers in 3 formats: 480p, 720p and 1080p. The “p” stands for “progressive” i.e. not interlaced, every frame is a full picture instead of only the odd or even lines. The 480 in “480p” stands for the number of lines in the image. 480p is roughly equivalent with DVD quality, 720p is “HD Ready” and 1080p is “Full HD”.

But let me give a concrete example of the resolution of 3 trailers:
resolutions of Apple Trailers
Continue reading Apple trailers: when 720p isn’t always 720p

Cloverfield

Cloverfield (released in Feb 2008)

“Five young New Yorkers throw their friend a going-away party the night that a monster the size of a skyscraper descends upon the city. Told from the point of view of their video camera, the film is a document of their attempt to survive the most surreal, horrifying event of their lives.”
from Wikipedia

Produced by J.J. Abrams (from Lost/Alias).

At least this time, they’re telling the story in less than 3 hours, instead of four or more consecutive seasons.