iOS6 losing its 3G cellular data settings – fix for Belgium

I upgraded my iPhone 4S to the new iOS6 the day it came out. As I expected, I had to reconfigure the cellular data settings (‘APN’). For some reason they always get lost during major OS updates. However, I have noticed the last weeks that, every now and then, my 3G connection stops working, and when I check the APN settings, they have disappeared. My colleagues, with iPhones and iPads on different cellular operators also have this problem. So for them, for me, and for anyone else who has this problem: here are the settings for the Belgian operators.

PROXIMUS/BELGACOM
APN: internet.proximus.be
Username: (empty)
Password: (empty)
MOBISTAR
APN: APN: iphone.mobistar
Username: (empty)
Password: (empty)
BASE
APN: gprs.base.be
Username: base
Password: base
MobileVikings
APN: web.be
Username: web
Password: web
Telenet
APN: telenetwap.be
Username: (empty)
Password: (empty)
Scarlet
APN: internet.bmbpartner.be
Username: (empty)
Password: (empty)

These are the most common ones.

The procedure is: goto General/Cellular/Cellular Data Network, verify they are all empty, fill in the correct values, leave the Cellular menu, switch your phone to “Airplane Mode” for 10 seconds, and then switch that back off. You should see the 3G logo appear again.

iPhone bandwidth: orders of magnitude – 2009

04112009175905[1]I did a bandwidth test the other day with the iPhone SpeedTest tool. I wanted to compare the speed using (standard) GPRS, using 3G and my own Wifi. The results were all a power of ten apart:

  • iPhone on Proximus GPRS: 35 kbps (download & upload)
  • iPhone on Proximus 3G: 350 kbps (download & upload)
  • iPhone via Wifi: 3500 kbps (download – upload is +- 300 kbps)

 

The real reason is that I wanted to see how fast I would wear out my Proximus data plan (200MB per month). The answer: with GPRS I would need more than 12 hours of continuous downloading, with 3G I could do it in less than 2 hours. So GPRS is pretty safe, it’s also easier on your battery, but you have to live with slow, pre-1996 modem-like performance. The latency – the time it takes to get your first byte after requesting a URL –  is easily 10 to 50 seconds. Not milliseconds, seconds!

 

As a side note: do not take a time-based data subscription, certainly not with the iPhone. My first post-iPhone Proximus invoice was 800,- euro, which is more than the price of my iPhone! When I contacted them about that, they immediately offered to reimburse it and advised me to switch to a size-based plan. I guess I was not the first one …